Historic Preservation
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 Historic Preservation

"Beautiful countryside, clean air, abundant water, healthy climate, quality schools, industrious work force, and easy accessibility to Baltimore" are some of the reasons that people were attracted to the City of Westminster as a place to live, work, and visit in 1887. Today, people are still drawn to the historic Westminster and its National Register Historic Districts for many of the same reasons.

The Westminster Historic District Commission administers the provisions of the Historic District Zone, a voluntary zoning designation that offers protections to historically valuable structures in the City of Westminster. The Commission also reviews applications for tax credits and sponsors various events to raise awareness of the value that historic resources add to our community.

The Historical Society of Carroll County was founded in 1939, and is dedicated to the research of piedmont Maryland's cultural heritage and the preservation and interpretation of objects significant to Carroll County history. They accomplish this mission by sponsoring educational programs, research projects, exhibitions, publications, and community outreach programs to provide broad public access to this region's cultural heritage.

The Pipe Creek Civil War Round Table of Carroll County, Maryland was founded in November 1996 by a small group of Carroll County citizens who were interested in preserving the richness of our Civil War heritage.

Corbit's Charge is encampment is commemorated because on June 29, 1863 at Westminster, Maryland, elements of the Union First Delaware Cavalry engaged the vanguard of the cavalry division of the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia under Major General J.E.B. Stuart. Though thoroughly lacking in experience and vastly outnumbered, companies C and D of the Delaware regiment, about 90 men in all, rode to meet the head of the rebel column of 5000 horsemen.

The Carroll County Farm Museum, located in Westminster, Maryland, provides the public with the opportunity to experience mid-nineteenth Century rural life. The Carroll County Farm Museum, the first of its kind in Maryland, opened its doors to the public for the first time on August 13, 1966. The Museum grounds include original farm structures, such as the Farmhouse, built in 1852-53, and a bank barn. Other buildings include a Smokehouse, Broom Shop, Saddlery, Springhouse, Living History Center, Wagon Shed, General Store exhibit, and a One-room Schoolhouse. Period artifacts and antiques complete the rural experience for visitors.